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Cold Forging

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The Cold Forging Process

Throughout history, cold forging or cold forming as a production process has seen intensifying interest and become one of the most widely used methods of making parts. The current energy crisis, material shortages, and rising costs have combined to force consideration of greater efficiency in parts making. Advantages of cold formed parts can reduce the effect these issues have on the production process.

Two major types of cold extruding steel are forward and backward extrusion. The primary purpose of cold extruding is to turn out parts as quickly as possible in the most economical way. The extrusion process conserves steel and provides an excellent opportunity for mass production. The spark plug shown above is an excellent example of cold forging’s ability to save material because the finished part actually contains most of the material from the pre-form. Spark plug bodies are produced by the millions each year using the extrusion process.

Cold forging refers to working metal at room temperature. Work hardening, also called strain hardening, occurs during cold forming due to dislocations in the metallic crystal structure. The materials yeild strength is not decreased, it's ductility is not increased, and work hardening occurs quickly. All these factors make cold forging extremly difficult. A large amount of force is needed and multiple operations are sometimes required to achieve more complex shapes. With proper lubrication, however, tool life is greatly increased when compared to hot or warm forging. The grain structure is stonger and many times hardening by heat treatment is not necessary due to the work hardening that occurs during the forming process.

History of Cold Forging The cold forging process was developed in Germany just before the end of World War II. It was used to produce artillery shells and other ordinance items for the war. After the war, the process came into American hands and a number of firms in the United States picked up the idea. At first, most of the work here was concentrated on shell manufacture but....more

Materials For Cold Forging Both ferrous and non-ferrous metals can be cold formed. The ability to forge these metals and the amount of possible deformation depends greatly on the chemical composition and annealed properties of the grade. Properties such as hardenss, and ductility are critical properties in detemining the formability a metal. It is important to know that the mechnical properties of materials are....more

Methods Of Cold Forming The methods of cold forming most commonly used are forward and backward extrusion. Both require a combination of properties to meet extrusion requirements. Material properties are one of the most important properties to be considered when deciding to use a cold extrusion process. In addition to extrusion, there are many other methods which can be used by....more

Advantages Of Cold Forging Improved material usage, reduced forging energy, and the elimination of machining processes with high precision forging are just a few reasons to consider cold forging as an alternative to other methods of manufacture. The current energy crisis, material shortages, and rising costs have combined to force consideration of greater ....more

Industrial Application of Cold Forgings Throughout history, cold forging or cold forming as a production process has seen intensifying interest and become one of the most widely used methods of making parts. The current energy crisis, material shortages, and rising costs have combined to force consideration of greater efficiency ....more

Our Capabilities The parts we form usually range from 1oz to 5 lbs with a maximum part length of 12 inches. We do form parts outside of these parameters depending on the type and location of deformation needed. We have hydraulic and mechanical presses ranging from 8 to 1200 Tons. ....more

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